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Dale Hansen Unplugged: 'This is the problem we have in America. The virus continues to spread. A thousand a day continue to die.'

198,000 dead and counting, but the Big Ten will be playing football next month and what could possibly matter more than that.

DALLAS — The Big Ten decided Wednesday to start playing football next month. Apparently their problems with the virus have been fixed, and I'd really like to know how.

What has possibly changed? The Big Ten's university presidents voted 11 to 3 last month to shut their fall sports down. 

They had six months since the virus first hit America, and six months later, they couldn't find a way to play.

Forty-three days after shutting it down, they somehow do. The vote Wednesday to play was unanimous with Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren saying, "We are so much more prepared than we were 43 days ago."

But are you really?

This is the problem we have in America. The virus continues to spread. A thousand a day continue to die. Many of you don't care and those who should, don't have a clue.

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Robert Redfield, told the Senate Wednesday that it will be at least next summer before we might have a vaccine that can get us back to normal, and a mask is the best weapon we have.

Now we're told Dr. Redfield, the director of the CDC, the man who is at least supposed to help us get out of the abyss, didn't understand the question. The question was too hard for him.

The question was "When will a vaccine be available to the general public?" and Dr. Redfield couldn't understand it, it confused him, and he made a mistake.

If that's true (and how could it not be, because I'm told it is by a very reliable source), why should I be surprised that Big Ten presidents can fix a problem in 43 days, a problem they couldn't fix in six months, when nothing has changed in America except the number of people dead in America?

There are 198,000 dead and counting, but the Big Ten will be playing football next month, and what could possibly matter more than that?

I'd like to ask Dr. Redfield that question, but I'm afraid he wouldn't understand it and I don't want to confuse him again.